Discovering Clam: One woman's plan to preserve the history of Cl - KBJR 6 Your Weather Authority: News, Weather & Sports

Discovering Clam: One woman's plan to preserve the history of Clam Lake, WI

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Discovering Clam: One woman's plan to preserve the history of Clam Lake, WI Discovering Clam: One woman's plan to preserve the history of Clam Lake, WI
Clam Lake, WI -

Located in the heart of the Chequamegon National Forest is Clam Lake, Wisconsin.

It's a town where the herds of nearby elk outnumber the residents, and you can count the number of downtown shops on one hand. 

It's also easy to pass through on your drive along Highway 77. But if you happen to stop, there's plenty of history to take in.

And Lynne Rice is determined to uncover all of that history.

Rice moved to Clam Lake, Wisconsin as a teenager, but it wasn't until 2013 when she first decided to look into the village's history.

"Camp Fire Island is what started me on this journey, which is only fitting because Howard Scotford was our founder," Rice said. 

The island is located in the middle of Upper Clam Lake, and Scotford's journal from 1912 is the only clue as to what Clam was like at the beginning of the 20th century. 

Scotford opened the resort on the island and wrote it all down in his journal. 

"Inside that journal was also a receipt for people that would stay on Camp Fire Island," Rice said. "It cost $12 a week to stay in 1914."

But perhaps the most popular activity for resort-goers was fishing.

And every summer, you'll find people fishing on Clam, but the resort is no longer. 

Sold by Scotford in 1936, it operated one more year. Then tragedy struck. 

"There was a fire that destroyed the main building and no one wished to rebuild it," Rice said. "That was the end of it."

While the Camp Fire island resort is no longer in operation, those who spend time at Clam Lake keep the spirit alive, by stopping in town, or fishing on the lake.

An exhibit featuring the history of Clam Lake will open Labor Day at the Glidden Historical Society Museum.

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