Bad River Band and U.S. Forest Service team up to take people to - KBJR 6 Your Weather Authority: News, Weather & Sports

Bad River Band and U.S. Forest Service team up to take people to the trail

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DRUMMOND, WI -

A ceremony was held this week for the unveiling of finished culturally historic panels that are now out on the North Country Scenic Trail along Lake Owen in Drummond, Wis. 

"The panels show information and photos from a Passport in Time (PIT) Project in the Lake Owen area to develop panels that provide some information on the cultural and historical uses around Lake Owen, by the Woodland people (which includes the Anishinaabe (Ojibwe), Menominee, Potawatomi and others," Assistant Ranger-Recreation & Lands, Teresa Maday, said. 

Maday assembled a team to develop the panels after she received a "Connecting Trails to Parks" grant through the National Park Service in 2015.  

Maday worked with the Bad River Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, of which she is a band member, to create a partnership.  

The Chequamegon Chapter installed the newly framed panels at the designated locations along the two mile section of the North Country Trail from Lake Owen Picnic Area east to East Horseshoe Road this month.  

"The next step is to work with Bayfield County Tourism Department and the Chequamegon Chapter to promote this section of the trail, to get more people to fall in love with the North Country National Scenic Trail and come out and hike with their families, friends or youth groups," Maday said. 

The hope is that the historically accurate panels will get more people on the North Country National Scenic Trail, especially on the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest. 

Maday hopes that local schools or youth groups will take their kids out to hike, and see the panels and the amazing views.

Of the team developing the panels was Edith Leoso, the tribal historical preservation officer, Susan Nelson, interpretive specialist with the Forest Service, Joyce McKay, retired Chequamegon-Nicolet Forest Archeologist and Jerry Petruzalek, cartographer. 

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